British Origin Ale Styles

The Brewers Association Beer Style Guidelines BJCP (Beer Judge Certification Program) Cider/Perry Guidelines and Mead Guidelines

British Origin Ale Styles

  1. English Style Ale: ordinary bitter
  2. Ordinary Bitter
Ordinary Bitter
  • Color: Gold to copper-colored
  • Clarity: Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Low to medium residual malt sweetness should be present
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low to medium-low
  • Perceived Bitterness: Medium
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Mild carbonation traditionally characterizes draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions, a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. Fruity-estery and very low diacetyl flavors are acceptable, but should be minimized in this form of Bitter.
  • Body: Low to medium
  • Additional notes: When using these guidelines as the basis for evaluating entries at competitions, competition organizers may choose to create subcategories which reflect English and American hop character.
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
     1.033-1.038
    (8.3-9.5 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.006-1.012
    (1.5-3.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    2.4%-3.3%
    (3.0%-4.2%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    20-35
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    5-12
    (10-24 EBC)
  1. Special Bitter or Best Bitter
  2. Special Bitter or Best Bitter
Special Bitter or Best Bitter
  • Color: Deep gold to deep copper
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Medium residual malt sweetness should be present
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low to medium at the brewer’s discretion
  • Perceived Bitterness: Medium and not harsh
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Low carbonation traditionally characterizes draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions, a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. Fruity-estery aromas and flavors and very low levels of diacetyl are acceptable, but should be minimized in this form of Bitter. The absence of diacetyl is also acceptable.
  • Body: Medium
  • Additional notes: When using these guidelines as the basis for evaluating entries at competitions, competition organizers may choose to create subcategories which reflect English and American hop character.
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.038-1.045
    (9.5-11.2 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.006-1.012
    (1.5-3.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    3.3%-3.8%
    (4.2%-4.8%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    28-40
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    6-14
    (12-28 EBC)
  1. ESB, Extra Special Bitter
  2. ESB, Extra Special Bitter
Extra Special Bitter
  • Color: Amber to deep copper
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Medium to medium-high
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Medium to medium-high
  • Perceived Bitterness: Medium to medium-high
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Low carbonation traditionally characterizes draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions, a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. The overall impression is refreshing and thirst quenching. Fruity-estery and very low diacetyl characters are acceptable, but should be minimized in this form of Bitter. The absence of diacetyl is also acceptable.
  • Body: Medium to full
  • Additional notes: When using these guidelines as the basis for evaluating entries at competitions, competition organizers may choose to create subcategories which reflect English and American hop character.
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.046-1.060
    (11.4-14.7 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.010-1.016
    (2.6-4.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    3.8%-4.6%
    (4.8%-5.8%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    30-45
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    8-14
    (16-28 EBC)
  1. Scottish-Style Light Ale
  2. Scottish-Style Light Ale
Scottish-Style Light Ale
  • Color: Golden to light brown
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Malty, caramel aroma may be present. A low to medium-low, soft and chewy caramel malt flavor should be present.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Should not be perceived
  • Perceived Bitterness: Low
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Yeast attributes such as diacetyl and sulfur are acceptable at very low levels. Bottled versions may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for mildly carbonated draft versions. Fruity-estery aromas, if evident, are low.
  • Body: Low
  • Additional notes: When using these guidelines as the basis for evaluating entries at competitions, Scottish Light Ale may be split into two subcategories: traditional (no smoke character) and peated (low level of peat smoke character). Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditional Scottish Light Ale exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers many examples with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. A peaty or smoky character may be evident at low levels. Scottish Light Ales with medium or higher smoke character are considered smoke flavored beers and should be categorized elsewhere.
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.030-1.035
    (7.6-8.8 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.006-1.012
    (1.5-3.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    2.2%-2.8%
    (2.8%-3.5%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    9-20
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    6-15
    12-30 EBC)
  1. Scottish-Style Heavy Ale
  2. Scottish-Style Heavy Ale
Scottish-Style Heavy Ale
  • Color: Amber to dark brown
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Malty, caramel aroma is present. The style exhibits a medium degree of sweet malt and caramel. The overall impression is smooth and balanced.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Should not be perceived
  • Perceived Bitterness: Perceptible but low
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Yeast attributes such as diacetyl and sulfur are acceptable at very low levels. Bottled versions may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for mildly carbonated draft versions. Fruity-estery aromas, if evident, are low.
  • Body: Medium with a soft chewy character
  • Additional notes: When using these guidelines as the basis for evaluating entries at competitions, Scottish Heavy Ale may be split into two subcategories: traditional (no smoke character) and peated (low level of peat smoke character). Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made Scottish Heavy Ale exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers many examples with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. A peaty or smoky character may be evident at low levels. Scottish Heavy Ales with medium or higher smoke character are considered smoke flavored beers and should be categorized elsewhere.
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.035-1.040
    (8.8-10 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.010-1.014
    (2.6-3.6 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    2.8%-3.2%
    (3.5%-4.1%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    12-20
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    8-30
    (16-60 EBC)
  1. Scottish-Style Export Ale
  2. Scottish-Style Export Ale
Scottish-Style Export Ale
  • Color: Medium amber to dark chestnut brown
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Sweet malt and caramel aromas and flavors define the character of a Scottish Export
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Should not be perceived
  • Perceived Bitterness: Low to medium
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Fruity-estery character may be apparent. Yeast attributes such as diacetyl and sulfur are acceptable at very low levels. Bottled versions may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for mildly carbonated draft versions.
  • Body: Medium
  • Additional notes: When using these guidelines as the basis for evaluating entries at competitions, Scottish Export Ale may be split into two subcategories: traditional (no smoke character) and peated (low level of peat smoke character). Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made Scottish Export Ale exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers many examples with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. A peaty or smoky character may be evident at low levels. Scottish Export Ales with medium or higher smoke character are considered smoke flavored beers and should be categorized elsewhere.
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.040-1.050
    (10-12.4 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.010-1.018
    (2.6-4.6 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    3.2%-4.2%
    (4.1%-5.3%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    15-25
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    9-19
    (18-38 EBC)
  1. English-Style Summer Ale
  2. English-Style Summer Ale
English-Style Summer Ale
  • Color: Pale to gold
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Residual malt sweetness is low to medium. Torrified or malted wheat is often used in quantities of 25 percent or less. Malt attributes such as biscuity or low levels of caramel are present.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: English, American or noble-type hop aroma should be low to medium. English, American or noble-type hop flavor should not be assertive and should be well balanced with malt character.
  • Perceived Bitterness: Medium-low to medium
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Mild carbonation traditionally characterizes draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions, a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. Low to moderate fruity-estery character is acceptable. No diacetyl or DMS character should be apparent.
  • Body: Low to medium-low
  • Additional notes: The overall impression is refreshing and thirst quenching
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.036-1.050
    (9-12.4 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.006-1.012
    (1.5-3.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    2.9%-4.0%
    (3.7%-5.1%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    20-30
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    3-6
    (6-12 EBC)
  1. Classic English-Style Pale Ale
  2. Classic English-Style Pale Ale
Classic English-Style Pale Ale
  • Color: Gold to copper
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Low to medium malt aroma and flavor is present. Low caramel character is allowable.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Earthy and herbal English-variety hop character should be perceived, but may result from the skillful use of hops of other origin.
  • Perceived Bitterness: Medium-low to medium-high
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Fruity-estery character is moderate to strong. Diacetyl can be absent or may be perceived at very low levels.
  • Body: Medium
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.040-1.056
    (10-13.8 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.008-1.016
    (2.1-4.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    3.5%-4.2%
    (4.4%-5.3%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    20-40
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    5-12
    (10-24 EBC)
  1. English-Style India Pale Ale
  2. English-Style India Pale Ale
English-Style India Pale Ale
  • Color: Gold to copper
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Medium malt flavor should be present
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Hop aroma and flavor is medium to high, and often flowery. Hops from a variety of origins may be used to contribute to a high hopping rate. Earthy and herbal English-variety hop character should be perceived, but may result from the skillful use of hops of other origin.
  • Perceived Bitterness: Medium to high
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Fruity-estery flavors are moderate to very high. Traditional interpretations are characterized by medium to medium-high alcohol content. The use of water with high mineral content results in a crisp, dry beer with a subtle and balanced character of sulfur compounds. Diacetyl can be absent or may be perceived at very low levels.
  • Body: Medium
  • Additional notes: Non-English hops may be used for bitterness or for approximating traditional English hop character. The use of water with high mineral content may result in a crisp, dry beer rather than a malt-accentuated version.
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.046-1.064
    (11.4-15.7 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.012-1.018
    (3.1-4.6 °Plato)
    Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    3.6%-5.6%
    (4.5%-7.1%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    35-63
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    6-14
    (12-28 EBC)
  1. English Strong Ale
  2. English Strong Ale
Strong Ale
  • Color: Amber to dark brown
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Medium to high malt and caramel sweetness. Very low levels of roast malt may be perceived.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Not perceived to very low
  • Perceived Bitterness: Evident but minimal, and balanced with malt flavors.
  • Fermentation Characteristics: A rich, often sweet and complex fruity-estery character can contribute to the profile of Strong Ales. Alcohol types can be varied and complex. Very low levels of diacetyl are acceptable.
  • Body: Medium to full
  • Additional notes: When using these guidelines as the basis for evaluating entries at competitions, competition organizers may choose to split this category into subcategories which reflect strong and very strong versions.
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.060-1.125
    (14.7-29 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.014-1.040
    (3.6-10 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    5.5%-8.9%
    (7.0%-11.3%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    30-65
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    8-21
    (16-42 EBC)
  1. Old Ale
  2. Old Ale
Old Ale
  • Color: Copper-red to very dark
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Fruity-estery aroma can contribute to the malt aroma and flavor profile. Old Ales have a malt and sometimes caramel sweetness.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low to medium
  • Perceived Bitterness: Evident but minimal
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Fruity-estery flavors can contribute to the character of this ale. Alcohol types can be varied and complex. A distinctive quality of Old Ales is that they undergo an aging process, often for years. Aging can occur on their yeast either in bulk storage or through conditioning in the bottle. This contributes to a rich, wine-like and often sweet oxidized character. Complex estery attributes may also emerge. Very low diacetyl character may be evident and is acceptable.
  • Body: Medium to full
  • Additional notes: Wood-aged attributes such as vanilla are acceptable. Horsey, goaty, leathery and phenolic character and acidity produced by Brettanomyces may also be present but should be at low levels and balanced with other flavors. Residual flavors that come from liquids previously aged in a barrel, such as bourbon or sherry, should not be present.
    This style may be split into two categories, strong and very strong. Brettanomyces and acidic characters reflect historical character. Competition organizers may choose to distinguish these types of old ale from modern versions.
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.058-1.088
    (14.3-21.1 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.014-1.030
    (3.6-7.6 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    5.0%-7.2%
    (6.3%-9.1%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    30-65
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    12-30
    (24-60 EBC)
  1. English-Style Pale Mild Ale
  2. English-Style Pale Mild Ale
English-Style Pale Mild Ale
  • Color: Light amber to medium amber
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Malt flavor and aroma dominate the flavor profile
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Hop aroma and flavor range from very low to low
  • Perceived Bitterness: Very low to low
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Very low diacetyl flavors may be appropriate in this low-alcohol beer. Fruity-estery character is very low to medium-low.
  • Body: Low to medium-low
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.030-1.036
    (7.6-9 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.004-1.008
    (1-2.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    2.7%-3.4%
    (3.4%-4.4%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    10-20
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    6-9
    (12-18 EBC)
  1. English-Style Dark Mild Ale
  2. English-Style Dark Mild Ale
English-Style Dark Mild Ale
  • Color: Reddish-brown to very dark
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Malt and caramel should be evident in the aroma and flavor while licorice and roast malt may also be present
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low
  • Perceived Bitterness: very low to low
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Very low diacetyl flavors may be appropriate in this low-alcohol beer. Fruity-estery character is very low to medium-low.
  • Body: Medium-low to medium
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.030-1.036
    (7.6-9 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.004-1.008
    (1-2.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    2.7%-3.4%
    (3.4%-4.4%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    10-24
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    17-34
    (34-68 EBC)
  1. English-Style Brown Ale
  2. English-Style Brown Ale
English-Style Brown Ale
  • Color: Copper to dark brown
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Roast malt may contribute to a biscuit or toasted aroma profile. Roast malt may contribute to the flavor profile. Malt profile can range from dry to sweet.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low
  • Perceived Bitterness: Very low to low
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Low to medium-low levels of fruity-estery flavors are appropriate. Diacetyl, if evident, should be very low.
  • Body: Medium
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.040-1.050
    (10-12.4 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.008-1.014
    (2.1-3.6 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    3.3%-4.7%
    (4.2%-6.0%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    12-25
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    12-17
    (24-34 EBC)
  1. Brown Porter
  2. Brown Porter
Brown Porter
  • Color: Dark brown to very dark. May have red tint.
  • Clarity: Beer color may be too dark to perceive clarity. When clarity is perceivable, chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures.
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Low to medium malt sweetness. Caramel and chocolate character is acceptable. Strong roast barley or strong burnt or black malt character should not be perceived.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low to medium
  • Perceived Bitterness: Medium
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Fruity-estery flavors are acceptable. Diacetyl should not be perceived.
  • Body: Low to medium
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.040-1.050
    (10-12.4 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.006-1.014
    (1.5-3.6 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    3.5%-4.7%
    (4.4%-6.0%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    20-30
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    20-35
    (40-70 EBC)
  1. Robust Porter
  2. Robust Porter
Robust Porter
  • Color: Very dark brown to black
  • Clarity: Opaque
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Medium to medium-high. Malty sweetness, roast malt, cocoa and caramel should be in harmony with bitterness from dark malts.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low to medium
  • Perceived Bitterness: Medium to high
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Fruity esters should be evident and balanced with all other characters. Diacetyl should not be perceived.
  • Body: Medium to full
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.045-1.060
    (11.2-14.7 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.008-1.016
    (2.1-4.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    4.0%-5.2%
    (5.1%-6.6%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    25-40
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    30+
    (60+ EBC)
  1. Sweet Stout or Cream Stout
  2. Sweet Stout or Cream Stout
Sweet Stout or Cream Stout
  • Color: Black
  • Clarity: Opaque
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Medium to medium-high. Malt sweetness, chocolate and caramel should contribute to the aroma and should dominate the flavor profile. Roast flavor may be perceived. Low to medium-low roasted malt-derived bitterness should be present.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Should not be perceived
  • Perceived Bitterness: Low to medium-low and serves to balance and suppress some of the sweetness without contributing apparent flavor and aroma
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Fruity-estery flavors, if present, are low. Diacetyl should not be perceived.
  • Body: Full-bodied. Body can be increased with the addition of milk sugar (lactose).
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.045-1.056
    (11.2-13.8 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.012-1.020
    (3.1-5.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    2.5%-5.0%
    (3.2%-6.3%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    15-25
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    40+
    (80+ EBC)
  1. Oatmeal Stout
  2. Oatmeal Stout
Oatmeal Stout
  • Color: Dark brown to black
  • Clarity: Beer color may be too dark to perceive. When clarity is perceivable, chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures.
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Coffee, caramel, roasted malt or chocolate aromas should be prominent. Roasted malt character of caramel or chocolate should be smooth without bitterness.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Optional, but should not upset the overall balance.
  • Perceived Bitterness: Medium
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Oatmeal is used in the grist, resulting in a pleasant, full flavor without being grainy. Fruity-estery aroma can range from not perceived to very low. Fruity-estery flavor is very low. Diacetyl should be absent or at extremely low levels.
  • Body: Full
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.038-1.056
    (9.5-13.8 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.008-1.020
    (2.1-5.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    3.0%-4.8%
    (3.8%-6.1%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    20-40
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    20+
    (40+ EBC)
  1. Scotch Ale
  2. Scotch Ale
Scotch Ale
  • Color: Light reddish-brown to very dark
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Scotch Ales are aggressively malty with a rich and dominant sweet malt aroma and flavor. A caramel character is often part of the profile. Dark roasted malt flavors may be evident at low levels.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Not perceived to very low
  • Perceived Bitterness: Not perceived to very low
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Fruity esters, if present, are generally at low levels. Low levels of diacetyl are acceptable.
  • Body: Full
  • Additional notes: A brewery-fresh experience is intended with these beers. Oxidation is not an acceptable character. Pleasantly oxidized Scotch Ales should be classified in Aged Beer categories.
    When using these guidelines as the basis for evaluating entries at competitions, Strong Scotch Ale may be split into two subcategories: traditional (no smoke character) and peated (low level of peat smoke character). Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made Strong Scotch Ales exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers many examples with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. A peaty or smoky character may be evident at low levels. Strong Scotch Ales with medium or higher smoke character are considered smoke flavored beers and should be categorized elsewhere.
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.072-1.085
    (17.5-20.4 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.016-1.028
    (4.1-7.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    5.2%-6.7%
    (6.6%-8.5%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    25-35
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    15-30
    (30-60 EBC)
  1. British-Style Imperial Stout
  2. British-Style Imperial Stout
British-Style Imperial Stout
  • Color: Ranging from dark copper typical of some historic examples, to very dark more typical of contemporary examples
  • Clarity: Opaque in darker versions. When clarity is perceivable, chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures.
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Extremely rich malty flavor, often expressed as toffee or caramel, and may be accompanied by very low roasted malt astringency.
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low to medium, with floral, citrus or herbal qualities.
  • Perceived Bitterness: Medium, and should not overwhelm the overall balance. The bitterness may be higher in darker versions while maintaining balance with sweet malt.
  • Fermentation Characteristics: High alcohol content is evident. High fruity-estery character may be present. Diacetyl should be absent.
  • Body: Full
  • Additional notes: This style was also originally called “Russian Imperial Stout.”
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.080-1.100
    (19.3-23.7 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.020-1.030
    (5.1-7.6 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    5.5%-9.5%
    (7.0%-12.0%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    45-65
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    20-35+
    (40-70+ EBC)
  1. British-Style Barley Wine Ale
  2. British-Style Barley Wine Ale
British-Style Barley Wine Ale
  • Color: Tawny copper to deep red/copper-garnet
  • Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures
  • Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Residual malty sweetness is high
  • Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Hop aroma and flavor are very low to medium. English type hops are often used but are not required for this style.
  • Perceived Bitterness: Low to medium
  • Fermentation Characteristics: Complexity of alcohols and fruity-estery attributes are often high and balanced with the high alcohol content. Low levels of diacetyl are acceptable. Caramel and some oxidized character (vinous aromas and/or flavors) may be considered positive attributes.
  • Body: Full
  • Original Gravity (°Plato)
    1.085-1.120
    (20.4-28 °Plato)
  • Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato)
    1.024-1.028
    (6.1-7.1 °Plato)
  • Alcohol by Weight (Volume)
    6.7%-9.6%
    (8.5%-12.2%)
  • Bitterness (IBU)
    40-65
  • Color SRM (EBC)
    -20
    (22-40 EBC)
Unchanged: “2018 Brewers Association Beer Style Guidelines used with permission of Brewers Association”