Honey

A sweet and viscous fluid produced by bees and other insects from the nectar of flowers that can be used in the same flavoring applications as other syrups. Its flavor and color are influenced by the nectar of the flower, not on the infusion of the fruit of the plant. Honey consists of equal parts of sucrose and fructose, plus trace minerals and pollen. It is 25% to 50% sweeter than sugar. Not all flowers have nectar that makes good honey; and bees other than honeybees make honey for food. but there are many hundreds of honey varietals.
  • Acacia or Black Locust
    Acacia or Black Locust
    Honey
  • Alfalfa or Lucerne
    Alfalfa or Lucerne
    Honey
  • Avocado
    Avocado
    Honey
  • Basswood
    Basswood
    Honey
  • Blackberry or Bramble
    Blackberry or Bramble
    Honey
  • Blueberry
    Blueberry
    Honey
  • Buckwheat
    Buckwheat
    Honey
  • Chestnut, Sweet
    Chestnut, Sweet
    Honey
  • Clover, White or Dutch
    Clover, White or Dutch
    Honey
  • Cotton
    Honey
  • Cranberry
    Cranberry
    Honey
  • Dandelion
    Dandelion
    Honey
  • Eucalyptus
    Eucalyptus
    Honey
  • Fireweed
    Fireweed
    Honey
  • Goldenrod
    Goldenrod
    Honey
  • Heather
    Heather
    Honey
  • Lavender
    Lavender
    Honey
  • Leatherwood
    Leatherwood
    Honey
  • Macadamia
    Macadamia
    Honey
  • Mesquite
    Mesquite
    Honey
  • Orange Blossom
    Orange Blossom
    Honey
  • Palmetto
    Palmetto
    Honey
  • Pine
    Pine
    Honey
  • Pumpkin Blossom
    Pumpkin Blossom
    Honey
  • Raspberry
    Raspberry
    Honey
  • Rosemary
    Rosemary
    Honey
  • Sage
    Sage
    Honey
  • Sourwood
    Sourwood
    Honey
  • Star Thistle
    Star Thistle
    Honey
  • Sunflower
    Sunflower
    Honey
  • Thyme
    Thyme
    Honey
  • Tupelo
    Tupelo
    Honey
  • White Clover
    White Clover
    Honey
  • Wildflower
    Wildflower
    Honey
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Acacia or Black Locust
Botanical Name Robinia pseudoacacia
Origin of Harvest native to the United States. Cultivated in other Europe (Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania, France and Italy), Oceania and Asia
Color Light gold to almost white but sometimes darker
Texture Smooth and runny
Taste/Flavor Delicately sweet with soft floral notes

Acacia, a light and clear honey made from nectar collected from the blossoms of Robinia pseudoacacia, also known as Black Locust in North America and Europe. It is one of the most popular and sweetest honey varieties because of its mild delicate floral taste. It can remain in a liquid state for a long period of time due to its high concentration of fructose. This honey is excellent for sweetening without altering the taste or the aroma of beverages.
Categories :
Honey
Alfalfa
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Alfalfa or Lucerne
Botanical Name Medicago sativa
Origin of Harvest produced throughout Canada, United States (Colorado, Idaho, Nevada), Argentina, Russia, Italy, and China
Color Light yellow to light amber
Texture Moderately thick
Taste/Flavor Mild to less sweet than other honeys, with distinctive but soft spice notes

Alfalfa honey is produced extensively throughout Canada and the United States from the purple or blue blossoms on summer alfalfa. Its grown profusely from the Midwest to the far West and parts of the Northeast United States, where it‘s an important crop for feeding livestock. Alfalfa is a perennial flowering plant that resembles clover with clusters of small purple flowers followed by fruits. Clover honey is white or extra light amber in color with a mild flavor and aroma similar to beeswax.
Categories :
Honey
Avocado – Persea americana
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Avocado
Botanical Name Persea americana
Origin of Harvest Origin: Mexico, Central America. Widely grown in the Western United States (California) and Israel
Color Dark amber
Texture Smooth, rich, and very thick
Taste/Flavor Robust with deep caramel flavor and molasses-like flavor notes

California avocado blossoms, avocado is an important food and bee forage shrub. It yields significant honey crops and average-quality pollen. The honey is distinctly dark, heavy-bodied and slow to crystallize. It is described as very dark amber with a mellow spicy, aroma, a rich flavor with a hint of molasses, and buttery. This honey originated in Southern Mexico and is now a common crop in Central America, Australia and other tropical regions.
Categories :
Honey
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82-621-A, American Linden
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Basswood
Botanical Name Tilia spp.
Origin of Harvest Ukraine, Russia, China, Hungary, Poland and the United Kingdom
Color Pale yellow to golden
Texture Moderately thick
Taste/Flavor Green apple spice, distinctive with somewhat woodsy, tangy, hay and herbal notes

Produced from the fragrant cream-colored Basswood blossoms found throughout North America, Basswood honey is one of the few exceptional honey varieties that has a light color and yet strong biting flavor and a distinctive lingering flavor. Its honey has a fresh taste similar to that of green, ripening fruit and can be identified by its water white color, warm herbal notes and clean finish.
Categories :
Honey
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Blackberry Flowers Honey Bees Insect Close Bee
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Blackberry or Bramble
Botanical Name Rubus spp.
Origin of Harvest Origin: Europe. Grown in the United States (California, Washington and Oregon)
Color Light to dark amber
Texture Thick and prone to crystallization
Taste/Flavor Mild but rich and sweet with delightful notes of blackberry in both taste and aroma

Honey bees provide the pollination necessary for the blackberry industry in California and the northwestern states of Washington and Oregon. Blackberry honey is made from all rubus species. Sometimes we find it as bramble honey and this tells us that it is made from wild rubus spp. This honey is the one of the few fruit blossom honeys that have the aroma and flavor of the fruit. There is no difference between blackberry honey and bramble honey. The latter one is creamy, delicate and slightly acidulous on the finish.
Categories :
Honey
Carpenter bees to eat blueberry flower
Little Honeybee feeds on Blueberry Blooms.
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Bumblebee hanging from a Blueberry Bloom.
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Blueberry
Botanical Name Vaccinium spp.
Origin of Harvest Origin North America. Widely grown in the eastern United States and Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South America
Color Light to medium amber
Texture Moderately thick, soft, and buttery
Taste/Flavor Toasty, butterscotch notes, herbal finish, reminiscent of lavender

More than 20 species of low blueberry shrubs with bell-shaped white or pinkish flowers are often found in the eastern U.S. and Canada. Blueberry honey is taken from the nectar and pollen from the small white tubular blueberry flowers. Blueberry honey has an aroma reminiscent of green leaves with a touch of lemon. Moderately fruity in flavor with a delicate, slightly buttery finish with a slight tang, and a blueberry aftertaste. It is light to medium amber in color.
Categories :
Honey
Buckwheat blossom
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Buckwheat
Botanical Name Fagopyrum esculentum
Origin of Harvest Origin: Siberia, Central Asia. Widely grown in the United States, France, Canada, Japan, and the Netherlands
Color Dark amber to brown but varies by region
Texture Thick and rich
Taste/Flavor Malty, robust molasses, spicy, assertive, memorable

Buckwheat honey is produced in Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin as well as in eastern Canada. Buckwheat is not a grain but a fruit seed (also known as kasha) related to rhubarb and sorrel. Honey bees are drawn to the irresistible fragrance of the profuse white flower clusters of the buckwheat plants. Its nectar produces a dark flavorful honey with marked molasses and malt flavors, and a lingering aftertaste, however the color and flavor of the honey may vary by region.
Categories :
Honey
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Chestnut, Sweet
Botanical Name Castanea sativa
Origin of Harvest Origin: Western Asia. Widely grown over Europe (Spain, Italy)
Color reddish-brown amber to dark amber/black
Texture Thick and viscous
Taste/Flavor Strong, nutty, spicy, a bitter aftertaste

Made from the nectar of chestnut tree flowers, chestnut or Castagno (Italian for “Chestnut) honey is one of the most popular honey varieties in Europe, particularly in Italy and Spain. Italian and Spanish chestnut honey is readily available in specialty food shops throughout the United States. Honey color is from a light amber to almost black, depending on the amount of honeydew it contains. The honey has a strong aromatic flavor with a slightly bitter aftertaste. Due to its high fructose content, it crystallizes very slowly.
Categories :
Honey
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Clover, White or Dutch
Botanical Name Trifolium repens
Origin of Harvest Origin: Mediterranean, now widely naturalized in Canada, United States, Sweden and New Zealand
Color Light golden to amber
Texture Mildly thick; tends to crystallize
Taste/Flavor Sweet, delicate floral aroma and taste, with a lasting sweetness on the palate

Clover honey is one of the most widely available and popular honey varieties. Of more than two hundred species of clover, fewer than ten contribute to honey production. Much of the clover honey on the market is polyfloral, meaning it isn’t purely from clover blossoms. Clover honey is light colored, tending toward light amber depending on where it is harvested. Its aroma is delicate, sweet and flowery with hints of freshly cut grass or hay, suggestive of spicy cinnamon and plums. Its taste is clean, mild and very sweet and lingers in the mouth. The honey crystallizes quickly into a fine-grained solid white mass. For this reason, it is often creamed.
Categories :
Honey
Cotton
Botanical Name Gossypium spp
Origin of Harvest Mainly produced in the Americas, Africa, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh and Southern Asia
Color Light in color
Texture Soft, buttery, and thick, tends to crystallize quickly
Taste/Flavor Distinctive floral notes with a pleasant tang

Cotton is in the mallow family and is related to hollyhocks, hibiscus, and okra, is one of the leading honey plants in the southern United States, and is produced in many countries of the world including Pakistan, India, Bangladesh and other South Asian countries. Cotton nectar is protected from the parching sun by large flowers and leaves. The honey is white to extra light amber with a low acidity, and a good, mild floral flavor.
Categories :
Honey
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Cranberry
Botanical Name Vaccinium oxycoccos (Europe), Vaccinium macrocarpon (Americas)
Origin of Harvest Central and northern Europe, northern United States, Canada and Chile
Color Medium amber with a pale red cast when a jar of honey is held up to light
Texture Moderately viscous
Taste/Flavor Luscious, rich, and complex with a distinctive cranberry taste without the tartness

Cranberry shrubs are an important cultivated crop in the northeast. They also grow wild in some areas. Cranberry honey is available in limited quantities because individual cranberry bogs bloom no more than two weeks annually. The honey is medium amber in color with a light red tint and a strong berry flavor. While cranberries are known for their tartness, its honey is delightfully sweet and pairs well with apples, pork, poultry and dark chocolate.
Categories :
Honey
bee collecting pollen on a yellow dandelion
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Dandelion
Botanical Name Taraxacum officinale
Origin of Harvest Grows in: temperate regions of Europe, Asia (China), North America, and New Zealand
Color Dark amber
Texture Runny with a tendency to crystallize over time
Taste/Flavor strong honey blended with mild tangy floral notes

Dandelion honey is a relatively strong honey blended with mild tangy notes. This dark amber honey delivers a distinct floral aroma of dandelions which are is traditionally prized as a medicinal herb in China, Tibet and India. Dandelion honey solidifies very rapidly and often forms very small crystals. The color is deep yellow or creamy beige if willow honey is also present. The fragrance is very intense, almost of ammonia. The flavor resembles the fragrance but is more delicate.
Categories :
Honey
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Bees are collecting eucalyptus nectar (honey).
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Eucalyptus
Botanical Name Eucalyptus spp.
Origin of Harvest Origin: Western Australia. Grown prolifically in California and in Australia, Western Cape, South Africa, and Brazil
Color Light amber to medium-dark red
Texture Thick and rich
Taste/Flavor Mildly sweet, fruity aftertaste; some varieties have a slight menthol flavor with complex herbal notes that linger on the palate

Eucalyptus honey comes from one of the larger plant genera, containing over 500 distinct species and many hybrids. Widely available, it varies greatly in color and flavor but tends to have a special herbal flavor carrying a hint of menthol that may not be most pleasing to everyone.
Blue Gum (Eucalyptus globulus) is a Eucalyptus honey species, that naturally grows in South Australia and Tasmania and is also one of the most widely planted commercial eucalypt species. It honey is amber in color and dense in texture.
Red Cap Gum (Eucalyptus erythrocorys Illyarie, illyaria) produces one of the darker premium varieties of honey. Having a relatively higher level of antioxidants, red gum honey has a thick constituency, a bold taste (like buckwheat honey).
Red Iron bark (Eucalyptus tricarpa) is a highly favored, premium Eucalyptus floral variety which blossoms through most of the year in eastern Australia. The honey from E. tricarpa is described as light amber or lighter, mild to taste, aromatic with a heavy body, and slow to crystallize to a very fine texture.
Yellow Box Gum is yet another eucalyptus bush variety (Eucalyptus melliodora) native to Australia. Its smooth texture, heavy-bodied yet mild Eucalyptus taste makes it one of the most highly regarded honey in the country.
Categories :
Honey
Fireweed Bee
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Fireweed
Botanical Name Epilobium angustibolium
Origin of Harvest Northwestern United States and Western Canada
Color Light amber
Texture Moderately runny
Taste/Flavor Delicate, mild fruit, grassy, sweet, and buttery

Fireweed is a tall perennial herb with large clusters of bright red-purple flowers that grows throughout western Canada and the Northwest United States (including Alaska), where it blooms from July through September. It is the only major source of honey that grows so far north, and It is the first plant which grows after a land is burnt. Fireweed honey is delicate with subtle tea-like notes and a smooth finish. Light amber in color and very mild, its sweet, almost fruity flavor.
Categories :
Honey
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Goldenrod
Botanical Name Solidago spp.
Origin of Harvest Native to Canada, the United States and Europe
Color Golden, like the color of the flower
Texture Thick, viscous, crystallizes quickly
Taste/Flavor Sweet and spicy, with a bit of a bite at the finish

This well-known, field-oriented plant features great compound clusters of yellow flowers, and can be found throughout North America. There are numerous goldenrods flowering plants in the aster family, Asteraceae from the thuggish Solidago canadensis to the more delicate Solidago virgaurea. Goldenrod covers high prairie, pasture land and even open woods. It is the source for large quantities of amber honey with a slightly strong, almost spicy flavor that is not overly sweet. Mead makers love to use it in brewing batches of mead.
Categories :
Honey
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Heather
Botanical Name Calluna vulgaris
Origin of Harvest Europe, Mainly from moorland in the United Kingdom
Color brown-reddish amber to dark amber
Texture Very thick, gel-like
Taste/Flavor Assertive floral, woody, herbal, tangy, slightly bitter, smoky

Heather honey, from the blossoms of Ling Heather, is rare. It is from true heather found on the moors of Scotland, England, and Ireland, and to a lesser degree in Germany. Heather honey (also called summer or autumn heather) is unique. Because of its gel-like consistency, the bees are unable to evaporate its moisture. Too thick for spin extraction, the honey must be pressed from the combs. It’s a popular honey to buy by the comb. Heather honey has one of the strongest and most pungent flavors. It is fragrant and floral with a very lingering aftertaste that is almost bitter.
Categories :
Honey
Bee & Lavender
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Lavender
Botanical Name Lavandula spp.
Origin of Harvest Origin: Asia, widespread in temperate Europe, Asia and N. America
Color Light white to extra light amber
Texture Smooth with moderate crystallization
Taste/Flavor medium warm, refreshing

Of over 39 species of Lavender, the most popular species for commercial crops are True Lavender, Spike Lavender and Lavandin, a hybrid of these two. These are the sources of most Lavender honeys. The characteristics of the honey vary depending on the relative concentrations of each of the species, mainly evidenced by differences in aroma and camphor notes. Lavender honey is a premium honey. Flowery, pleasant, well balanced and rounded, very fine honey aroma and the delicate floral scent with an evident Lavender component. It has a very persistent medium sweet taste that grows with the finish.
Categories :
Honey
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Leatherwood
Botanical Name Eucryphia lucida
Origin of Harvest Native to Tasmania
Color Light to dark amber
Texture Smooth, thick, viscous, creamy; tends to crystallize
Taste/Flavor Musky and spicy, robust with a complex lingering taste; mildly sweet

Leatherwood honey is, as its name suggests, the honey that bees produce from the nectar of the Leatherwood (Eucryphia lucida) plants’ flower. The Leatherwood plant is endemic to Tasmania, an island off the Southeast coast of Australia, and is found in the wetter forest regions throughout the Western portion of the state. Leatherwood is the single most important nectar plant in Tasmania accounting for about 70% of all honey produced. Leatherwood trees have large white blossoms that yield copious amounts of nectar that produces a unique taste that has a strong floral and distinctive spicy flavor.
Categories :
Honey
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Macadamia
Botanical Name Macadamia integrifolia var.
Origin of Harvest Origin; New South Wales, Queensland. Now grown in the United States (Hawaii)
Color Opaque amber
Texture Soft and very thick
Taste/Flavor Bold, rich taste; caramel and butterscotch notes with a tangy tropical fruit finish

Sourced from the floral nectar of the Macadamia Nut tree, Macadamia Honey first originated in Australia and today is also supplied from the United States (Hawaii). Macadamia tree flowers are creamish-white in color with pendulous racemes that grow to 30 cm. This medium amber colored honey variety possesses a distinctive, complex aroma and a delicate nutty flavor. Honey is produced as a unifloral from hives used to pollinate the macadamia nut crop. It can produce up to a super every 3 weeks or potentially 2 supers during pollination.
Categories :
Honey
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Mesquite
Botanical Name Prosopis spp.
Origin of Harvest Southwestern United States (Arizona), Mexico, and Chile
Color Dark amber or brown
Texture Viscous like molasses; crystallizes
Taste/Flavor Haunting smoky aroma (like the wood) and taste

In the southwestern United States and Mexico, the flowers of mesquites (Prosopis glanulosa and Prosopis pubescens) are excellent sources of honey. In Arizona, mesquites are rated by beekeepers as the most valuable plant for honey production. The mesquite tree is prized for its sweet, smoky smelling wood, primarily used in barbecues and meat smokers. It produces numerous golden-colored blooms during spring and summer. The honey’s color can vary from amber to water white. Considered earthy and aromatic with a dominating flavor.
Categories :
Honey
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A photo by Roberta Sorge. unsplash.com/photos/kp9UVn-PUac
Orange Blossom
Botanical Name Citrus spp.
Origin of Harvest Origin: Spain and Mexico. Grown in Europe (United Kingdom, Spain, and France), temperate and subtropical, North and South America
Color Light amber to dark amber
Texture Moderately thick
Taste/Flavor sweet with mild floral, fruity-hints of citrus-orange and orange blossom

Orange blossom honey, often a combination of citrus sources, is usually light in color and mild in flavor with a fresh fruity scent, and a fragrant citrus taste. Orange blossom honey originated from Spain/Mexico but is produced in many countries, and is a leading honey plant in southern Florida, Texas, Arizona and California. Orange trees bloom in March and April and produce a white to extra light amber honey with a pronounced aroma of orange blossoms. It has a sweet, fruity taste with a flowery perfume aftertaste.
Categories :
Honey
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Avon Park Air Force Range
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Palmetto
Botanical Name Serenoa spp.
Origin of Harvest Native to deep southern United States (North Carolina south to Florida), Cuba, Turks & Caicos Islands, and The Bahamas
Color Mild and light amber
Texture Very thin and does not thickens even in winter
Taste/Flavor subtle smokey notes, very pleasant, sweet and robust

Palmetto is also known as cabbage palmetto, blue palmetto, Carolina palmetto, common palmetto, swamp cabbage and sabal palmetto. Distributed from North Carolina south to Florida, palmetto is especially abundant along the Atlantic Coast. Trees up to 60 feet tall produce whitish flowers in great compound clusters. Its honey is light amber to amber in color with a thinner body than most honeys. Palmetto honey’s taste is full-bodied and herbal in flavor with woody overtones.
Categories :
Honey
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Pine
Botanical Name Pinus spp.
Origin of Harvest Produced in central and Southern Europe (Greece), New Zealand, Australia, and United States (Northern California)
Color brownish amber-dark amber
Texture thick without crystallization
Taste/Flavor malty, resinous, less sweet than other honeys

Pine Tree honey (sometimes also known as forest honey, fir honey, honeydew or tea tree honey) consists of the majority of the total honey production in Greece. Pine honey is a unique product made from honeydew, sweet juices excreted by sap-sucking insects, usually aphids and scale insects that the bees collect as they would nectar. Pine honey sometimes is called honeydew honey, is produced throughout Europe, New Zealand, Australia, and, in a limited quantity, in Northern California. It is not particularly sweet, tastes a little bitter, has a strong aroma, and is rather resistant to crystallization.
Categories :
Honey
Macro of a honeybee collecting nectar on golden pumpkin flower.
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Pumpkin Blossom
Botanical Name Cucurbita maxima
Origin of Harvest Origin: South America. Widely found throughout the United States (Oregon, California)
Color light amber to dark amber
Texture thick, sticky consistency
Taste/Flavor slight floral flavor

Found throughout the United States wherever this prolific plant is cultivated, the blooms on pumpkin blossoms produce enough nectar to keep bees in a pumpkin patch well fed. However, the honey can still be difficult to source since it can be obtained only during the flowering period of the pumpkin, which is not a very long one. In addition pumpkin flowers do not have much nectar. Pumpkin honey is described as a medium–light amber to dark amber in color with a spicy, complex, almost squashy flavor with a light floral fragrance that can vary depending on the variety.
Categories :
Honey
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Raspberry
Botanical Name Rubus idaeus
Origin of Harvest Found wild in Great Britain and in woods throughout Europe, North Africa and in north and west Asia
Color White to light amber
Texture Viscous and smooth
Taste/Flavor Pleasantly sweet with subtle floral flavor notes and a slight raspberry essence finish

The raspberry is a thorny shrub that produces just one crop of fruit per year. Its springtime clusters of white, 5-petaled, rose-like flowers give way to red raspberries that mature in summer. Depending on the cultivar, raspberries flower from September to January persisting for 3 to 6 weeks. The flowers secrete large volumes of nectar that is very attractive to bees. Raspberry honey is light amber in color with a mellow, smooth flavor and unique raspberry finish. This honey can crystallizes as soon as it leaves the comb so is typically sold in cremed form.
Categories :
Honey
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Rosemary Infused Honey recipe
Rosemary
Botanical Name Rosmarinus officinalis
Origin of Harvest Origin: Mediterranean (Spain). Grown in temperate Europe (Italy, France, and Spain), Asia, Africa
Color Light white to light amber
Texture Viscous, often crystallized into a creamy spread
Taste/Flavor Mildly sweet and fragrant with soft floral notes and herbal minty finish (rosemary belongs to the mint family)

The nectar from tiny sky blue flowers of the rosemary plant makes a beautiful honey reminiscent of the taste of the herb. Rosemary grows prolifically in a Mediterranean climate, which is why most of the rosemary honey in our markets is from Italy, France, and Spain. Honey that comes from rosemary flowers is light yellow in color, and has a fresh, woodsy aroma and surprisingly herbaceous taste gives way to a delicately soft sweetness.
Categories :
Honey
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Sage
Botanical Name Salvia spp.
Origin of Harvest Origin: Mediterranean, North Africa
Color Light amber
Texture Smooth, moderately thick, tends not to crystallize
Taste/Flavor Mixture of distinctive yet delicate herbal notes; mild and not overly sweet

Sage Honey, primarily produced in California, is light in color, heavy bodied and has a mild but delightful flavor. There are three types of sage honey: Black Button Sage, Purple Sage and White Sage. Sage honey is rich and light in color with a predominantly sweet, clover-like flavor and an elegant floral aftertaste. The most popular honey in the western United States, described as yellowish–brown, strong herbal aroma, a heavy-bodied honey that has a medium rate of crystallization to a fine grain. Typically, sage honey is available only when adequate rainfall has enabled sage blossoms to bloom.
Categories :
Honey
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Sourwood
Botanical Name Oxydendrum arboreum
Origin of Harvest Southeastern United States, especially Appalachia
Color Ranges from very light yellow to pale amber
Texture Smooth and buttery
Taste/Flavor Light and sweet with spicy and floral notes with hints of cinnamon, allspice, ginger, and anise

Sourwood honey is revered by Southerners and honey connoisseurs. The sourwood tree grows in the Appalachian and Blue Ridge Mountains from southern Pennsylvania to North Georgia. Producing it is a challenge for even the most expert beekeeper because of scarce numbers of sourwood trees, the importance of sunlight and rain to ensure ample nectar, and short bloom times (June–August). Blossoms hang in drooping clusters of tiny bell-shaped flowers that resemble lily of the valley. The honey is considered a rare treat.
Categories :
Honey
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Star Thistle
Botanical Name Centaurea maculosa
Origin of Harvest Origin: the Mediterranean. Grown in the United States (California)
Color White to light amber
Texture thick viscous appearance with a tendency to crystallize over time
Taste/Flavor sweet with a grassy, anise aroma and flavor

Star thistles, including knapweeds and cornflowers, belong to the Centaurea genus. Centaurea is probably one of the largest sources of all thistle honeys. A one-foot high annual herb introduced from the Mediterranean Region, star thistle is widespread in California where it produces a white or extra light amber honey with a slight greenish cast. Star thistle is moderately sweet with a grassy, anise aroma and flavor. Farmers consider star thistle a noxious weed, but bees love it and the honey is gorgeous.
Categories :
Honey
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Bee and Sunflower
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Sunflower
Botanical Name Helianthus spp.
Origin of Harvest Origin: North America. Widely grown in temperate Europe, S. and N. America, Asia; subtr. Asia, Africa, and in Oceania
Color yellow to golden light amber
Texture Typically, runny; tends to crystallize to a fine grain
Taste/Flavor slightly herbaceous with citrus notes

Growing up to nine feet tall, the sunflower is cultivated in vast fields that are a paradise for bees as its blossom produces far more nectar than smaller flowering plants. The Sunflower is a minor but useful producer of nectar and honey. Being members of the daisy family, those nodding “flowers” are made up of hundreds of tiny florets, each one producing its share of nectar. It produces a marketed unifloral honey as vast areas are grown around the world; the largest honey volume is produced in the Ukraine—25,000 – 30,000 tons a year. The honey is consistently described as light to extra light amber in color with a characteristic aroma and flavor that tastes slightly herbaceous with citrus notes.
Categories :
Honey
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jar of honey with honeycomb
Thyme
Botanical Name Thymus spp.
Origin of Harvest Mediterranean and temperate Europe, N. America, Oceania
Color yellow-light brown amber to amber
Texture Thick and rich, sometimes creamed
Taste/Flavor Lively, complex herbal quality; robust flavor with mint notes; toasty

The mountainsides throughout Greece and Sicily are covered with wild thyme. The honey produced from the nectar of thyme (Thymus capitatus) blossoms has been revered since antiquity and is often mentioned in ancient poetry. Another variety of thyme honey is New Zealand thyme honey which is produced from escaped garden thyme (Thymus vulgaris), that is naturalized in Central Otago.
Categories :
Honey
Tupelo Trees in bloom along the Apalchicola River.
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Jars of Tupelo Honey.
Tupelo
Botanical Name Nyssa ogeche
Origin of Harvest Native to Southeastern United States (Florida, Georgia) and grown in South Asia
Color light golden amber color with a greenish cast
Texture Runny and will not granulate
Taste/Flavor Mild pleasant floral notes in both aroma and on the palate

Tupelo honey, sometimes called swamp honey, is made from the flowers of the Ogeeche tupelo (Nyssa ogeche), a tree that grows profusely in swamps along the Apalachicola, Choctahatchee and Ochlockonee Rivers and their tributaries in northwestern Florida, United States. Beekeepers place their apiaries on high platforms or even boats in the wetlands to keep them out of the water and tend the hives by boat. It is usually light golden amber with a faint greenish glow, and has a mild, distinctive taste. Because of its high fructose content, Tupelo honey is one of the sweetest honey varieties and it will not granulate.
Categories :
Honey
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White Clover
Botanical Name Trifolium repens
Origin of Harvest Worldwide, primarily produced in New Zealand, Canada and the Unites States
Color Light white to light amber
Texture crystallizes quickly into a fine-grained solid white mass. For this reason it is often creamed
Taste/Flavor sweet, flowery flavor

Clover honey is popular all over the world, but especially in the USA, Canada and New Zealand. There are many different varieties of clover found throughout the United States, and most import in honey production include the Red clover, White or Dutch clover, Crimson clover and the Alsike Clover. The region where the clover is cultivated influences the color of the clover honey, which can vary from white to amber. The white or Dutch clover honey is produced in high amounts in various parts of the world, where it is cultivated on large surfaces, not only as a forage crop but also as a rich nectar source. White Dutch Clover honey varies in color from very white to extra light amber with a delicate floral bouquet and flavor.
Categories :
Honey
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Wildflower
Botanical Name Various plants
Origin of Harvest Various plants -Worldwide, primarily from the Unites States
Color Shades of amber from light to dark, depending on the season
Texture Thick and smooth, sometimes crystallizes or is creamed
Taste/Flavor Depending on flowers, complex with all sorts of flavor notes from anise to mint to green apple

Wildflower is a polyfloral honey made from the nectar’s from a wide variety of blooms that change with the seasons and regions. Samples of the honey differ greatly, depending on where it is produced. Its color can vary from very light to dark and flavor range from light and fruity to tangy and rich, depending on the mix from the different seasonal wildflowers and the regions in which it is produced.
Categories :
Honey