Hybrid/Mixed Lagers or Ale

Source: 2023 Brewers Association Beer Style Guidelines

The Brewers Association’s beer style guidelines reflect, as much as possible, historical significance, authenticity, or a high profile in the current commercial beer market. Often, the historical significance is not clear, or a new beer type in a current market may represent only a passing fad and is quickly forgotten. For these reasons, the addition of a style or the modification of an existing one is not undertaken lightly and is the product of research, consultation, and consideration of market actualities, and may take place over several years.

Since 1979 the Brewers Association has provided beer style descriptions as a reference for brewers and beer competition organizers. Much of the early work was based on the assistance and contributions of beer journalist Michael Jackson; more recently these guidelines were greatly expanded, compiled, and edited by Charlie Papazian. The task of creating a realistic set of guidelines is always complex. The beer style guidelines developed by the Brewers Association use sources from the commercial brewing industry, beer analyses, and consultations with beer industry experts and knowledgeable beer enthusiasts as resources for information

Session Beer

Color: The color should mimic the classic style upon which the beer is based
Clarity: Appearance may vary from brilliant to hazy to cloudy and should mimic the classic style upon which the beer is based
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Malt attributes should mimic the classic style upon which the beer is based, but at lower overall intensity due to lower original gravity.
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Hop attributes should mimic the classic style upon which the beer is based, but at lower overall intensity in order to maintain the balance typical of that style.
Perceived Bitterness: Should mimic the classic style upon which the beer is based, but at lower overall intensity in order to maintain the balance typical of that style.
Fermentation Characteristics: Varies with underlying style
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: This category includes beers of any style that 1) are at or below 5.0% abv (4.0% abw) and 2) have an original gravity and alcohol content below the range of the classic style as defined in these guidelines. These beers exhibit lower original gravity and alcohol content than the classic style. Balance and drinkability are key to a successful session beer. A beer at or below 5.0% abv (4% abw) that adheres to the specifications of a classic style is not categorized as Session Beer. For example, low gravity beers such as Belgian-Style Table Beers, Belgian-Style Session Ales, or English-Style Mild Ales should be categorized within their appropriate categories. A beer below 0.5% abv (0.4% abw) is categorized as a Non-Alcohol Malt Beverage.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.008-1.040 (2.1-10 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.004-1.010 (1-2.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume)0.4%-4.0% (0.5%-5.0%)
Bitterness (IBU) 10-35
Color SRM (EBC) 2+ (4+ EBC)

American-Style Cream Ale

Color: Straw to gold
Clarity: Chill haze should be very low or not be present
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: The dominant flavor is of pale malt sweetness at medium-low to medium levels. Caramel malt attributes should be absent. Attributes typical of corn or other adjuncts may be present at low levels.
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Hop aroma and flavor is very low to low or may be absent
Perceived Bitterness: Very low to low
Fermentation Characteristics: Low level fruity esters may be present. Sulfur and DMS are usually absent but may be present at extremely low levels. Diacetyl should not be present.
Body: Low
Additional notes: These crisp and refreshing beers are fermented warm with ale or lager yeast and lagered cold.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.044-1.052 (11-12.9 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.004-1.010 (1-2.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume)3.4%-4.5% (4.3%-5.7%)
Bitterness (IBU) 10-22
Color SRM (EBC) 2-5 (4-10 EBC)

California Common Beer

Color: Light amber to medium amber
Clarity: Appearance should be clear. Chill haze should not be present
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Medium level toasted or caramel malt attributes are present.
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Low to medium-low
Perceived Bitterness: Medium to medium-high
Fermentation Characteristics: Fruity esters are low to medium-low. Diacetyl should be absent.
Body: Medium
Additional notes: California Common beers are brewed with lager yeasts but fermented at warm temperatures like ales

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.045-1.056 (11.2-13.8 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.010-1.018 (2.6-4.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 3.6%-4.5% (4.6%-5.7%)
Bitterness (IBU) 35-45
Color SRM (EBC) 8-15 (16-30 EBC)

Kentucky Common Beer

Color: Medium to deep amber
Clarity: Chill haze or yeast haze is acceptable
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Medium-low to medium. Sweet malt is the dominant flavor attribute. Any of corn, caramel, toffee, or bready attributes may be present.
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Low to medium. May exhibit floral or spicy attributes typical of early 20th century North American hop varieties.
Perceived Bitterness: Low to medium
Fermentation Characteristics: Low to medium-low fruity esters may be present. Very low levels of DMS, if present, are acceptable. Diacetyl should not be present.
Body: Medium-low to medium with a dry finish enhanced by high carbonation
Additional notes: This American-born regional style proliferated around Louisville, Kentucky, from the Civil War era until Prohibition. Corn grits or flakes were commonly used at a rate or 25-35% of the total grist. Minerally attributes resulted from the use of hard brewing water. These beers were consumed very young, going from brewhouse to consumer in as little as one week. Early 20th century brewing literature mentions a slight tartness developing during fermentation as a characteristic attribute of this style. If tartness is present in modern versions, it should be at very low levels.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.040-1.055 (10-13.6 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.010-1.018 (2.6-4.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 3.2%-4.4% (4.0%-5.5%)
Bitterness (IBU) 15-30
Color SRM (EBC) 11-20 (22-40 EBC)

American-Style Wheat Beer

Color: Straw to dark brown
Clarity: Clear to cloudy
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Low to medium-low level pale malt attributes are present in paler versions. Medium-low to medium-high malt attributes such as cocoa, chocolate, caramel, toffee, or biscuit may be present in darker versions. Roast malt astringency is acceptable in darker versions when balanced with malt sweetness.
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Low to high
Perceived Bitterness: Low to medium
Fermentation Characteristics: Low to medium fruity esters are present. Diacetyl and phenolic, clove-like attributes should not be present.
Body: Very low to medium
Additional notes: These beers can be fermented with either ale or lager yeast. The grist should include at least 30 percent malted wheat. Versions served with yeast may exhibit somewhat higher perceived bitterness and fuller mouthfeel. If present, yeast character and flavor can range from low to medium, and should be in harmony with malt and hop attributes, and not sharp.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.036-1.056 (9-13.8 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.004-1.016 (1-4.1 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume)2.8%-4.4% (3.5%-5.6%)
Bitterness (IBU) 10-35
Color SRM (EBC) 2-10 (4-20 EBC)

Removed from styles in 2023

Kellerbier or Zwickelbier

Color: Varies depending on the underlying European origin lager or ale style
Clarity: Typically slightly hazy to moderately cloudy, but may become clear through settling. A small amount of yeast haze is acceptable and traditional.
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies depending on the underlying style
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Varies depending on underlying style. Low level attributes typical of late or dry hopping may be present in some versions.
Perceived Bitterness: Varies depending on underlying style
Fermentation Characteristics: Low levels of sulfur and acetaldehyde or other volatiles normally scrubbed during fermentation, if present, can enhance the flavor of these beers. Low fruity esters may be present and may vary slightly from the underlying style due to age and the presence of yeast. Diacetyl is usually absent in these beers but may be present at low levels in keller versions of beer styles which can contain diacetyl when fully aged, such as Bohemian-Style Lager.
Body: Varies depending on underlying style
Additional notes: Kellerbier or Zwickelbiers are unfiltered versions of lager or ale styles of European origin. These can include traditional Helles, Dunkel, Dortmunder, Vienna, Rotbier, Bohemian, European Dark, Koelsch, Alt, as well as less common traditional or contemporary European-origin lager and ale styles. Carbonation may be below levels typical of the underlying beer style, which may result in decreased head retention. These beers are typically unfiltered, but they may be filtered and then redosed with yeast. Whether filtered or unfiltered these beers are packaged and served with very low to moderate amounts of yeast.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

American-Style Fruit Beer

Color: Can range from pale to very dark depending on the underlying style and is often influenced by the color of added fruit
Clarity: Clear or hazy is acceptable

Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Not present to medium-low
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Not present to medium-low
Perceived Bitterness: In balance with fruit character and usually at very low to medium levels
Fermentation Characteristics: American-Style Fruit Beers are fermented with traditional German, British or American ale or lager yeast. Beers fermented with Belgian-style, German-style Hefeweizen or other South German wheat beer or Berliner-style Weisse yeasts should be categorized elsewhere. Fruit beers exhibiting sourness should be categorized elsewhere. Attributes typical of wild fermentation should not be present.
Body: Varies with style
Additional notes: Fruit aromas, ranging from subtle to intense, should be present and should not be overpowered by hop aromas. Fruit or fruit extracts, used as an adjunct in either the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, provide harmonious fruit character ranging from subtle to intense. Within the framework of these guidelines, fruit beers fermented with Belgian yeast (Wit, Abbey, Farmhouse, Saison, or Brettanomyces) should be categorized as Belgian-Style Fruit Beers, or possibly as fruited Brett Beers. Some beers may fit into this category if they contain fruity adjuncts but no actual fruit. As an example, a juniper berry-flavored beer with notable juniper berry fruity flavor or aroma would be categorized as a Fruit Beer, whereas a beer in which the juniper berry character is more herbal or spicy would be categorized as an Herb and Spice Beer. Fruit Beers brewed with wheat are categorized as Fruit Wheat Beers. Fruit Beers brewed with unusual fermentable(s), but no wheat, should be categorized as Fruit Beers. All of the various India Pale Ale or Imperial India Pale Ale styles brewed as Fruit Beers are categorized as Experimental India Pale Ales. All fruited Sour Beers are categorized elsewhere. All fruited Wood- and Barrel-Aged beers whether sour or not are categorized elsewhere. Within the framework of these guidelines, coconut is defined as a vegetable, and a beer containing coconut is categorized as Field Beer. Likewise beers containing chili peppers are categorized as Chili Beer.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.030-1.110 (7.6-25.9 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 2.0%-9.5% (2.5%-12.0%)
Bitterness (IBU) 5-70
Color SRM (EBC) 5-50 or color of fruit (10-100 or color of fruit EBC)

Fruit Wheat Beer

Color: Generally straw to light amber and often influenced by the color of added fruit.
Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable. These beers may be served with or without yeast. When served with yeast, appearance is hazy to very cloudy.
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Low to medium-low
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Low to medium
Perceived Bitterness: Low to medium
Fermentation Characteristics: These beers can be fermented with either ale or lager yeast depending on the underlying wheat beer style. Low fruity esters are typical. Diacetyl should not be present. In versions served with yeast, yeasty aroma and flavor should be low to medium.
Body: Low to medium
Additional notes: The grist should include at least 30 percent malted wheat. Fruit or fruit extracts contribute aroma and flavor expressing true fruit complexity. Versions served with yeast should demonstrate a full yeasty mouthfeel. Fruited examples of wheat beer styles that are not commonly brewed with fruit and do not exhibit attributes of wood-aging should be categorized as Fruit Wheat Beers. These could include fruited versions of various wheat beer styles of European origin such as Weizens, Adambier or Grodziskie. Fruited wheat beers that exhibit sourness fall within various fruited sour beer categories. Such beers could deviate from parameters shown for those styles but should be suggestive of the underlying classic beer style with fruit added. Fruited versions of Berliner Weisse or Contemporary Gose fall within those categories as they are commonly brewed with fruit. Within the framework of these guidelines, coconut is defined as a vegetable, and a beer containing coconut is categorized as Field Beer. Likewise beers containing chili peppers are categorized as Chili Beer.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.030-1.110 (7.6-25.9 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 2.0%-9.5% (2.5%-12.0%)
Bitterness (IBU) 10-35
Color SRM (EBC) 2-10, or color of fruit (4-20, or color of fruit EBC)

Belgian-Style Fruit Beer

Color: Can range from pale to dark depending on underlying Belgian style, and is often influenced by the color of added fruit
Clarity: Clear to hazy beer is acceptable
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Can vary from not perceived to medium-high
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Low to high
Perceived Bitterness: Varies with underlying Belgian style
Fermentation Characteristics: Acidic bacterial fermentation attributes may be absent or may be present; if present, such attributes contribute to acidity and enhance fruity balance.
Body: Varies with style
Additional notes: Fruit aromas, ranging from subtle to intense, should be present and should not be overpowered by hop aromas. Belgian-Style Fruit Beers are fermented with traditional Belgian yeast, (Wit, Abbey, Farmhouse, etc.). Fruit or fruit extracts, used as adjuncts in either the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, provide harmonious fruit character ranging from subtle to intense. Classifying these beers can be complex. Within the framework of these guidelines, coconut is defined as a vegetable, and a beer containing coconut is categorized as Field Beer. Likewise a beer containing chili peppers is categorized as Chili Beer. Because wood vessels may be used for fermentation or aging, attributes typical of wood-aging such as vanillin, or from liquids previously aged in wood may be present. Fruited Belgian-style beers which exhibit Brettanomyces may be categorized in this style. However, a fruited Saison exhibiting Brett character should be categorized as a Specialty Saison. A fruited version of a Brett Beer is categorized as Fruited Brett Beer when such a Brett-containing beer is not based on an existing underlying Belgian beer style. A Lambic-Style fruit beer should be categorized as a Belgian-Style Fruit Lambic. Fruited Belgian-Style beers brewed with additional adjuncts could fall in this category or perhaps as Experimental Beers. Fruit beers fermented with German, British or American ale or lager yeast should be categorized as American-Style Fruit Beers or as Fruit Wheat Beers.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.030-1.110 (7.6-25.9 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 2.0%-9.5% (2.5%-12.0%)
Bitterness (IBU) 5-70
Color SRM (EBC) 5-50 (10-100 EBC)

Field Beer

Color: Can range from pale to very dark depending on the underlying style and is often influenced by the color of added fruit
Clarity: Clear to hazy is acceptable
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Very low to medium-high
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low to medium-high
Perceived Bitterness: Very low to medium-high. Vegetable character should not be muted by hop character.
Fermentation Characteristics: Varies with underlying style
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: Vegetable aromas, ranging from subtle to intense, should be present and should not be overpowered by hop aromas. Field Beers are any beers incorporating vegetables as flavor or carbohydrate adjuncts in either the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation. The vegetable character should be in harmony with other attributes and can range from subtle to intense. Within the framework of these guidelines, coconut is defined as a vegetable, and a beer containing coconut is categorized as Field Beer. However, within the framework of these guidelines, India Pale Ales brewed with vegetables are categorized as Experimental India Pale Ale. All beers containing chili peppers are categorized as Chili Beer. Nuts generally impart much more flavor than fermentables; within the framework of these guidelines, beers containing nuts are categorized as Field Beer.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.030-1.110 (7.6-25.9 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 2.0%-10.5% (2.5%-13.3%)
Bitterness (IBU) 5-70
Color SRM (EBC) 5-50 (10-100 EBC)

Pumpkin Spice Beer

Color: Can vary from pale to very dark depending on the underlying style
Clarity: Clear to hazy is acceptable
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Can vary from low to medium-high depending on the underlying style
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: None to medium and, if present, in harmony with spice, pumpkin or squash, and other attributes.
Perceived Bitterness: Low to medium-low
Fermentation Characteristics: Typical of underlying beer style
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: These are any beers using pumpkins (Cucurbita pepo) or winter squash as an adjunct in either the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation. Pumpkin or squash may not be present or may range from subtle to intense. They are spiced with other ingredients whose character should be present and in balance. While cinnamon, allspice, clove, and nutmeg are common spices added to American-type pumpkin beers, other spices may be used. For example, a brewer could replicate a Wit-Pumpkin spiced beer by using orange peel and coriander.
When using these guidelines as the basis for evaluating entries at competitions, brewers may be asked to provide supplemental information about entries in this category to allow for accurate evaluation of diverse entries. Such information might include the underlying beer style upon which the entry is based, or other information unique to the entry such as spice(s) used, pumpkin or squash used, if any, and related processing or other factors which influence perceived sensory outcomes.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.030-1.110 (7.6-25.9 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 2.0%-9.5% (2.5%-12.0%)
Bitterness (IBU) 5-35
Color SRM (EBC) 5-50 (10-100 EBC)

Pumpkin/Squash Beer

Color: Can range from pale to very dark depending on the underlying style
Clarity: Clear to hazy is acceptable
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Can vary from low to medium-high depending on the underlying style
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: None to medium
Perceived Bitterness: Low to medium-low
Fermentation Characteristics: Typical of underlying beer style
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: Pumpkin/Squash beers are any beers incorporating pumpkins (Cucurbita pepo) or winter squash as an adjunct in either the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation. Pumpkin or squash aromas and flavors, ranging from subtle to intense, should be present. Pumpkin/Squash beer is not spiced, but may have flavors associated with other beer styles such as smoked beer, fruit beer, sour beer, etc. Spice aromas and flavors should be absent. Versions exhibiting spice aromas or flavors are categorized as Pumpkin Spice Beer, as Herb and Spice beer, or possibly as Experimental beer.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.030-1.110 (7.6-25.9 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 2.0%-9.5% (2.5%-12.0%)
Bitterness (IBU) 5-35
Color SRM (EBC) 5-50 (10-100 EBC)

Chocolate or Cocoa Beer

Color: Can range from pale to very dark depending on the underlying style
Clarity: Clear to hazy is acceptable
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Medium-low to medium-high malt sweetness balanced with cocoa flavors and aromas
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Hop aroma is not present to very low. Hop flavor may be lower than is designated for underlying style allowing chocolate to contribute to the flavor profile without becoming excessively bitter.
Perceived Bitterness: Very low to medium-low
Fermentation Characteristics: Typical of underlying beer style. Attributes derived from chocolate or cocoa should be apparent in all such beers, ranging from subtle to intense, and in harmony with the overall flavor profile of the beer.
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: Chocolate Beers are beers of any classic style which incorporate dark chocolate or cocoa in any form. Beers made with white chocolate do not typify this category; however, beers which clearly exhibit attributes typical of white chocolate could be categorized as chocolate beer.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Coffee Beer

Color: Pale to black depending on the underlying style
Clarity: Clear to hazy is acceptable
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Medium-low to medium malt sweetness provides balance with coffee flavor and aroma
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Low to high depending on the underlying style
Perceived Bitterness: Varies with underlying style
Fermentation Characteristics: Typical of underlying style
Body: Reflective of the underlying beer style
Additional notes: Coffee beers incorporate coffee in any form. Coffee character should be apparent as the defining attribute of this category, ranging from subtle to intense, and should be in harmony with other attributes of the underlying beer. Other flavors arising from the use of flavored coffee may also be present.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Chili Pepper Beer

Color: Can range from pale to very dark depending on the underlying style
Clarity: Can range from clear to hazy depending on the underlying beer style
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Can vary from very low to medium-high depending on the underlying style
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low to very high
Perceived Bitterness: Very low to medium-high
Fermentation Characteristics: Chili pepper aroma and flavor attributes should be harmonious with the underlying beer style. Chili pepper character may be expressed as vegetal, spicy, or hot on the palate.
Body: Representative of underlying style
Additional notes: Chili Beer is any beer using chili peppers for flavor, aroma, or heat. Chili character can range from subtle to intense. Chili pepper aroma may or may not be present. Within the framework of these guidelines, all beers containing chili peppers are categorized as Chili Beers. A beer made with chili peppers which represents more than one style, such as a chili beer with chocolate for example, should nonetheless be categorized as Chili Beer rather than as Experimental Beer.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.030-1.110 (7.6-25.9 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 2.0%-10.5% (2.5%-13.3%)
Bitterness (IBU) 5-70
Color SRM (EBC) 5-50 (10-100 EBC)

Herb and Spice Beer

Color: Varies depending on underlying style
Clarity: Clear to hazy is acceptable
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies depending on intention of brewer, underlying beer style, and intensity of herb or spice aroma attributes
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Not essential but may be present and may be more assertive than herb-spice character
Perceived Bitterness: Very low to medium-low. Reduced hop bitterness tends to accentuate herb/spice character.
Fermentation Characteristics: Aromas and flavors of individual spices may not always be identifiable
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: Herb and Spice beer is any beer brewed with herbs or spices derived from leaves, roots, seeds, fruits, vegetables, flowers, etc. and which exhibits herbal or spicy attributes. Herb or spice character can range from subtle to intense. Classifying these beers can be complex. Beers which exhibit herbal or spicy character are considered Herb and Spice Beer. Beers brewed with chili peppers are categorized as Chili Pepper Beer. Beers brewed with or without pumpkin in which herb or spice attributes typical of pumpkin pie dominate are categorized as Pumpkin Spice Beer.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.030-1.110 (7.6-25.9 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 2.0%-9.5% (2.5%-12.0%)
Bitterness (IBU) 5-40
Color SRM (EBC) 5-50 (10-100 EBC)

Specialty Beer

Color: Very light to black depending on the underlying style
Clarity: Clear to hazy is acceptable
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies depending on intention of brewer
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low to very high
Perceived Bitterness: Very low to very high
Fermentation Characteristics: Within the framework of these guidelines, Specialty Beer refers to beers brewed with atypical sources of fermentable sugar such as grains, tubers, starches, syrups, or other sources which contribute to alcohol content. The hallmark of Specialty Beers are the distinctive sensory attributes arising from these special fermentable ingredients, which should be present in the aroma, flavor, and overall balance of the beer. Examples could include maple syrup, agave, potatoes, wild rice, or any other sources of carbohydrate not commonly used in modern beer styles. Beers containing wheat are categorized in one of several wheat beer styles. The use of rice or corn would not normally be considered unusual since these adjuncts are commonly used in beer production. However, beers made with rice or corn varieties which imbue highly distinctive flavor attributes might be categorized as Specialty Beers.
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: Classifying these beers can be complex. Beers brewed with honey or rye are categorized as Specialty Honey Beer or Rye Beer respectively. Beers made with unusual fermentables, which also contain spices, fruits, or other ingredients, and which therefore represent a combination of two or more hybrid beer styles, are categorized as Experimental Beers. Within the framework of these guidelines, nuts generally impart much more flavor than fermentables, and beers containing nuts are categorized as Field Beer. Likewise, within the framework of these guidelines, coconut is defined as a vegetable and beers containing coconut are categorized as Field Beer. Beers brewed with roots, seeds, flowers etc. which exhibit herbal or spicy characters are categorized as Herb and Spice Beers. While beers brewed with fruits or vegetables may derive fermentable carbohydrate from those sources, they are most appropriately categorized as Fruit Beer or Field Beer respectively. Beers representing various India Pale Ale or Imperial India Pale Ale styles brewed with unusual fermentables, and which may or may not also contain fruit(s), spice(s) or other ingredients, are categorized as Experimental India Pale Ale.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.030-1.140+ (7.6-32.1+ °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.006-1.030+ (1.5-7.6+ °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 2.0%-20+% (2.5%-25+%)
Bitterness (IBU) 1-100
Color SRM (EBC) 1-100 (2-200 EBC)

Specialty Honey Beer

Color: Very light to black depending on underlying style
Clarity: Clear to hazy is acceptable
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies depending on intention of brewer
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low to very high
Perceived Bitterness: Very low to very high
Fermentation Characteristics: Honey Beers may be brewed to a traditional style or may be experimental. Honey Beers incorporate honey as a fermentable sugar in addition to malted barley. Honey character should be present in aroma and flavor but should not be overpowering. Beers which represent various India Pale Ale and Imperial India Pale Ale styles brewed with honey are categorized as Experimental India Pale Ale.
Body: Varies with underlying style

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.030-1.110 (7.6-25.9 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 2.0%-9.5% (2.5%-12.0%)
Bitterness (IBU) 1-100
Color SRM (EBC) 1-100 (2-200 EBC)

Rye Beer

Color: A wide range of color is acceptable. Lighter versions are straw to copper, while darker versions are dark amber to dark brown.
Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable in versions packaged and served without yeast. In versions served with yeast, appearance may range from hazy to very cloudy.
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: In darker versions, malt aromas and flavors can optionally include low roasted malt character expressed as cocoa/chocolate or caramel. Aromatic toffee, caramel, or biscuit character may also be present. Low level roastiness, graininess, or tannin astringency is acceptable when balanced with low to medium malt sweetness.
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Low to medium-high
Perceived Bitterness: Low to medium
Fermentation Characteristics: Low levels of spicy and fruity ester aromas are typical. Yeast-derived aroma and flavor attributes such as clove-like or other phenolics may be present when consistent with underlying beer style. These beers can be fermented with either ale or lager yeast. Diacetyl should not be present. Low to medium yeast aroma may be present in versions packaged with yeast.
Body: Low to medium. Rye can impart textural qualities ranging from dry and crisp to smooth and velvety.
Additional notes: The grist should include sufficient rye so that rye character is evident in the beer. Rye character is often described as any of spicy, black pepper-like, or earthy attributes. Beers brewed with rye that do not exhibit rye character are categorized in other beer styles. Versions served with yeast should possess a full yeasty mouthfeel.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Brett Beer

Color: Any color is acceptable. Beer color may be influenced by the color of added fruits or other ingredients.
Clarity: Chill or yeast haze is allowable at low to medium levels at any temperature
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: In darker versions, any of roasted malt, caramel or chocolate aromas and flavors are present at low levels.
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Low to high
Perceived Bitterness: Low to high
Fermentation Characteristics: Medium to high fruity esters are present. Acidity resulting from Brettanomyces fermentation results in a complex flavor profile. Brettanomyces character should be present at low to high levels, expressed as any of horsey, goaty, leathery, phenolic, fruity, or acidic aroma and flavor attributes. Brettanomyces character may or may not be dominant. Acidity from Brettanomyces should be low to medium-low. Cultured yeast strains may be used in the fermentation. Beers fermented with Brettanomyces that do not exhibit attributes typical of Brettanomyces fermentation are categorized elsewhere. Beers in this style should not incorporate bacteria or exhibit a bacteria-derived flavor profile. Diacetyl and DMS should not be present.
Body: Low to high
Additional notes: Fruited versions will exhibit fruit flavors in balance with other elements. Wood vessels may be used for fermentation and aging; such beers may or may not exhibit attributes typical of wood-aging such as vanillin or of liquids previously aged in a barrel (bourbon, sherry, etc.) A beer exhibiting additional sensory attributes arising from microbes other than Brett is categorized as Mixed Culture Brett Beer. Various India Pale Ales fermented with Brett are categorized as Experimental India Pale Ale.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Mixed-Culture Brett Beer

Color: Any color is acceptable. Beer color may be influenced by the color of added fruits or other ingredients.
Clarity: Chill haze, bacteria and yeast-induced haze is allowable at low to medium levels at any temperature.
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: In darker versions, any of roasted malt, caramel, or chocolate aromas and flavors are present at low levels.
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Low to high
Perceived Bitterness: Low to high
Fermentation Characteristics: Medium to high fruity esters are present. Acidity resulting from fermentation with Brettanomyces or bacteria results in a complex flavor profile. Brettanomyces character should be present and expressed as any of horsey, goaty, leathery, phenolic, fruity, or acidic aroma and flavor attributes. Cultured yeast may be used in the fermentation. Bacteria should be incorporated and in evidence. Bacteria will contribute acidity which may or may not dominate the flavor profile. Diacetyl and DMS should not be present.
Body: Low to high
Additional notes: Fruited versions will exhibit fruit flavors in balance with other elements. Wood vessels may be used for fermentation and aging; such beers may or may not exhibit attributes typical of wood-aging such as vanillin or of liquids previously aged in a barrel (bourbon, sherry, etc.).

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Ginjo Beer or Sake-Yeast Beer

Color: Pale to dark brown
Clarity: Slight chill haze is acceptable
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Very low to medium
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Low to medium and in harmony with sake-like character
Perceived Bitterness: Low to medium and in harmony with sake-like character
Fermentation Characteristics: These beers are brewed with sake yeast or sake (koji) enzymes. The unique byproducts of sake yeast and koji enzymes should be distinctive and in harmony with other elements. Sake character may best be described as having mild fruitiness and mild earthiness expressed as mushroom or umami protein-like attributes. A high amount of alcohol may be evident.
Body: Varies depending on original gravity. Mouthfeel also varies.
Additional notes: High carbonation should be present.

Original Gravity (°Plato) 1.040-1.090 (10-21.6 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) 1.008-1.020 (2.1-5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 3.4%-8.2% (4.3%-10.2%)
Bitterness (IBU) 12-35
Color SRM (EBC) 4-20 (8-40 EBC)

Fresh Hop Beer

Color: Varies with underlying style
Clarity: Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures. Hop haze is allowable at any temperature.
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Fresh hop aroma and flavor is prominent exhibiting green grass-like, fresh mown hay/grass or other fresh hop attributes.
Perceived Bitterness: Varies with underlying style
Fermentation Characteristics: Fruity esters may present at levels consistent with the underlying beer style being made with fresh hops
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: These ales or lagers are brewed with freshly harvested hops, typically no more than 72 hours prior to being added. Such hops might be undried fresh or frozen cones or ground material, or freshly kilned dried cones or pellets. These beers distinctly highlight the fresh hops used and are typically consumed while fresh to maximize the bright fresh hop attributes. Aging these beers will typically modify and reduce fresh-hop characters resulting in unique flavor outcomes.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Wood- and Barrel-Aged Beer

Color: Varies with underlying style and can be influenced by the color of added fruit(s) if any
Clarity: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Bitterness: Varies with underlying style
Fermentation Characteristics: Typical of underlying style of beer being aged
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: These are any traditional or experimental style of lager, ale or hybrid beer aged in either a wooden barrel or in contact with wood chips, spirals, strips or many other formats. These beers are aged with the intention of developing unique attributes imparted by the wood, or liquids that had previously been stored in contact with the wood. Wood-aging does not necessarily impart wood flavors, but does result in distinctive sensory outcomes. Used sherry, rum, whiskey, tequila, port, wine, and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to a beer. A balance of flavor, aroma, and mouthfeel results from the marriage of new beer with attributes imparted by the wood or barrel. Categorizing these beers can be complex. Sour versions which do not exhibit attributes typical of Brettanomyces are categorized as Wood-Aged Sour Beer. Wood-Aged Beers which exhibit sensory attributes typical of Brettanomyces alone, or of Brettanomyces and other microbes, are categorized as Brett Beer or Mixed-Culture Brett Beer respectively. Wood-aged versions of various classic India Pale Ales are categorized as Experimental India Pale Ale. Belgian-style ales that exhibit attributes of wood-aging are categorized as Other Belgian Ale or within other Belgian categories. Various fruited Belgian-style beers that exhibit attributes of wood-aging are categorized as Belgian-Style Fruit Beer; similarly, Saison aged in wood and which exhibits attributes of wood-aging is categorized as Specialty Saison.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Wood- and Barrel-Aged Sour Beer

Color: Varies with underlying style
Clarity: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Bitterness: Varies with underlying style
Fermentation Characteristics: Typical of underlying style of sour beer being aged
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: These are any traditional or experimental style of lager, ale or hybrid beer aged in either a wooden barrel or in contact with wood, and exhibiting acidity derived from exposure to bacteria. These beers are aged in the presence of microflora (either present in the wood or introduced at some time in the brewing process) with the intention of introducing sourness to the beer. These beers are aged with the intention of developing unique attributes imparted by the wood, or by liquids that had previously been stored in contact with the wood. Wood-aging does not necessarily impart wood flavors but does result in distinctive sensory outcomes. Used sherry, rum, whiskey, tequila, port, wine, and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to a beer. A balance of aroma, flavor, and mouthfeel results from the marriage of new beer with attributes imparted by the wood or barrel, and with sourness or other attributes derived from bacteria. Wood-Aged Sour Beer fermented with Brettanomyces or which exhibit sensory attributes typical of Brettanomycesis categorized elsewhere. Such beers made with combinations of fruit(s), herb(s) or spice(s), or other ingredients, and which therefore represent combinations of multiple hybrid beer styles, are categorized as Experimental Wood- and Barrel-Aged Beer.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Aged Beer

Color: Varies with underlying style
Clarity: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Bitterness: Varies with underlying style
Fermentation Characteristics: Aged Beers are any beers aged for over one year. A brewer may brew any type of beer of any strength and enhance its character with various aging conditions for an extended time. In general, beers with high hopping rates, roast malt, high alcohol content, and complex herbal, smoke or fruit character are the best candidates for aging. Aged Beers may be aged in bottles, cans, kegs or other non-wooden vessels. Aged character may be expressed in mouthfeel, aroma, and flavor. Often, aged character is the result of oxidative reactions that either bring individual flavor components into harmony or are unique flavors unto themselves. Sherry-like and fruity flavors often develop during aging, and hop character often changes. No matter what the effect, the overall character should be balanced and without aggressive flavors. The level of change created by aging will vary with the duration of aging and the underlying beer style. Mildly-flavored beers are more likely to develop aggressive and unpleasant oxidation. Positive transformations are more likely to occur in beers with higher levels of hops, malt, or alcohol.
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: Within the framework of these guidelines, various Wood- and Barrel-Aged Beers which subsequently undergo aging of one or more years in glass or stainless, and, which clearly exhibit sensory outcomes of that additional aging, may be categorized as Aged Beers. However, Brett Beers, Sour Beers or any other beers exhibiting attributes of aging in the presence of any microflora must be categorized elsewhere. Beers which have undergone aging, but which do not exhibit attributes typical of aging, are categorized within their base styles.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Experimental Beer

Color: May vary widely with ingredients used
Clarity: Varies with ingredients used and brewing process
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: May vary widely with ingredients used and brewing process
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: May vary widely with ingredients used and brewing process
Perceived Bitterness: May vary widely with ingredients used and brewing process
Fermentation Characteristics: Will vary widely depending on the nature of the techniques and or ingredients used to create the beer
Body: May vary widely with ingredients used and brewing process
Additional notes: Experimental beers are beers that 1. employ unique and unusual techniques, ingredients, or both; or 2. beers that do not meet the criteria of individual existing categories, representing a combination of two or more hybrid, specialty or classic categories (with the exception of beers brewed with chili peppers). Experimental beers are primarily grain-based with a minimum of 51% of fermentable carbohydrates derived from malted grains. Beers produced using non-experimental techniques or ingredients are considered experimental beers if their properties overlap two or more existing categories and exhibit the distinctive characteristics of each of those categories. Uniqueness is the primary consideration when evaluating this category. Within the framework of these guidelines, field, fruit, chocolate, coffee, spice, specialty, wood-aged or other beers that fit within another individual hybrid category are not categorized as experimental beers. Within the framework of these guidelines, all beers brewed with chili peppers are categorized as chili beers, and should not be categorized as experimental beers.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Experimental India Pale Ale

Color: Straw to very dark, varying widely with ingredients used
Clarity: May range from clear to very high degree of cloudiness. Starch, yeast, hop, protein, and other compounds can contribute to a wide range of hazy appearance within this category
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Very low to medium-low malt aroma and flavor may be present, and may exhibit attributes typical of various adjuncts and specialty malts
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Medium to very high hop aroma and flavor are present, with attributes typical of hops from any origin
Perceived Bitterness: Low to very high
Fermentation Characteristics: Fruity esters are low to high and may contribute to an overall highly fruity impression regardless of the presence or absence of fruit(s) used and can contribute to the perception of sweetness and be complementary to the hop profile. Yeast choices can vary widely as can sensory outcomes; very low to low phenolic or other attributes typical of wine, champagne or Brettanomyces yeast strains may be present but are not required. Carbonation can range from average to high, with higher levels often associated with a crisp mouthfeel. Diacetyl and DMS should not be present.
Body: Very low to medium, depending on grist and yeast choice, enzymatic treatment, finishing adjunct(s) and other fermentation parameters. Mouthfeel can vary widely from light to full and from dry to silky.
Additional notes: Beers in this category recognize the cutting edge of IPA brewing around the world. Experimental India Pale Ales are either 1) any of White, Red, Brown, Brut (fermented with champagne yeasts), Brett (fermented with Brettanomyces), Lager (fermented with lager yeasts), or many other IPA or Imperial IPA types or combinations thereof currently in production, and fruited or spiced versions of these, or 2) fruited, spiced, field (flavored with vegetables other than chili peppers), wood- and barrel-aged, or other elaborated versions of classic American, Juicy or Hazy, Imperial, British, or any other IPA categories. They range widely in color, hop, and malt intensity and attributes, hop bitterness, balance, alcohol content, body, and overall flavor experience. Dark versions of India Pale Ale that do not meet the specifications for American-Style Black Ale may be considered Experimental India Pale Ale. 

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Historical Beer

Color: Varies with underlying style
Clarity: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Bitterness: Varies with underlying style
Fermentation Characteristics: Typical of underlying style of sour beer being aged
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: Beers in this category include established historical beers or brewing traditions from any era or part of the world that do not fit within another beer style defined within these guidelines. Some Historical beers that could fit categories such as Experimental, Herb & Spice, Field Beer, etc. may be categorized as historical beers. This category pays tribute to beers that incorporate unique brewing ingredients, techniques, or both that were used in the past. Within the framework of these guidelines, examples of Historical Beers include South American Chicha, Nepalese Chong/Chang, African sorghum-based beers, and countless others.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Wild Beer

Color: Any color is acceptable. Versions made with fruits or other flavorings may take on corresponding hues.
Clarity: Clear or hazy due to yeast, chill haze or hop haze.
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Generally, these beers are highly attenuated resulting in very low to low malt character. Maltier versions should display good overall balance with other flavor components.
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Very low to high
Perceived Bitterness: Very low to low
Fermentation Characteristics: Aromas may vary significantly due to fermentation attributes contributed by various known and unknown microorganisms. The overall balance should be complex and balanced. Wild beers are spontaneously fermented with microorganisms that the brewer has introduced from the ambient air/environment near the brewery in which the beer is brewed. Wild Beers may not be fermented with any cultured strains of yeast or bacteria. Wild Beers may or may not be perceived as acidic. They may include a highly-variable spectrum of flavors and aromas derived from the wild microorganisms with which they are fermented. The overall balance of flavors, aromas, appearance and body are important factors in assessing these beers.
Body: Very low to medium
Additional notes: Spontaneously fermented beers with fruit, spice or other ingredients should be categorized as Wild Beers. Within the framework of these guidelines, beers which hew to classic or traditional categories such as Belgian-Style Lambic, Gueuze, Fruit Lambic, etc. should be categorized as such, rather than as Wild Beers.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Smoke Beer

Color: Any beer of any style incorporating smoke, and therefore may range from very light to black
Clarity: Varies with underlying beer style
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying beer style
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying beer style
Perceived Bitterness: Varies with underlying beer style
Fermentation Characteristics: For Smoke Beers based on lager styles, any phenolic notes (if present) should be derived from smoke; in such lagers yeast-derived phenolics should not be present.
Body: Varies with underlying beer style
Additional notes: Any style of beer can be smoked. The goal is to reach a balance between the style’s character and the smoky properties. Any smoke beer that does not fit other smoke beer categories are appropriately categorized here.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Other Strong Ale or Lager

Color: Varies with underlying style
Clarity: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Bitterness: Varies with underlying style
Fermentation Characteristics: Within the framework of these guidelines, beers of any style intentionally brewed to a higher alcohol content than defined within that style’s guidelines are categorized as Other Strong Beer. These beers should achieve a balance between the style’s characteristics and the additional alcohol, and are not wood- or barrel-aged. All Wood- and Barrel-Aged Beers that meet the criteria for elevated alcohol content shown below are categorized as any of several Wood- and Barrel-Aged Beers.
Body: Varies with underlying style

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Gluten-Free Beer

Color: Varies with underlying style
Clarity: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style. Grains and fermentables which differ from those typically used to produce a given beer style can and will produce flavor and aroma outcomes that differ from traditional versions. Such differences are to be expected and are acceptable.
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Bitterness: Varies with underlying style
Fermentation Characteristics: Although brewers may design and identify these beers according to defined style guidelines, these beers should be evaluated on their own merits without strict adherence to defined style parameters.
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: This category includes lagers, ales or other beers made from fermentable sugars, grains and converted carbohydrates and must also include some portion of cereal. All ingredients must be free of gluten. Within the framework of these guidelines, beers brewed with barley, wheat, spelt, rye, and other gluten-containing ingredients may not be categorized as Gluten-Free. Gluten-Free Beers may contain malted grains that are gluten-free.
NOTE: These guidelines do not supersede any government regulations. Wine, mead, flavored malt beverages or beverages other than ‘beer’ as defined by the TTB (U.S. Trade and Tax Bureau) are not considered ‘gluten-free beer’ under these guidelines. Gluten-reduced beers’ original ingredients would have gluten content that has been reduced by enzymes or other processes to reduced levels. Gluten-reduced beers should be categorized in the classic style category most appropriate for the beer, rather than as Gluten-Free Beer.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style

Non-Alcohol Malt Beverage

Color: Varies with underlying style
Clarity: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Malt Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Hop Aroma & Flavor: Varies with underlying style
Perceived Bitterness: Varies with underlying style
Fermentation Characteristics: Non-alcohol (N/A) malt beverages can emulate the character of any beer style defined within these guidelines but with no or nearly no alcohol (less than 0.5 percent abv). Due to their nature, non-alcohol malt beverages will have a profile lacking the complexity and balance of flavors that beers containing alcohol will display. N/A beers should be assessed with this is mind, and should not be given negative evaluations for reasons related to the absence of alcohol.
Body: Varies with underlying style
Additional notes: For purposes of competition, brewers will be asked to verify that the alcohol content of entries in this category are <0.5% abv.

Original Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato) Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume) Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU) Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC) Varies with style